Logo

Friday Morning Seminar - October 22 with Christopher Dole & Fatih Artivinli - Shared screen with speaker view
Mary Jo DelVecchio Good
55:09
Brilliant analysis and deeply complex
Sadeq Rahimi
55:54
Agreed!!
Sadeq Rahimi
01:02:55
I’ve always enjoyed Chris’s work, but I love the new areas he’s working through and unpacking.
orkideh behrouzan
01:06:01
Thank you this was really fascinating!
Virginia Moreira
01:07:07
Thank you for this wonderful presentation Chris!
Junior Oriol
01:19:31
Reading about this 7.4 earthquake in Izmit where 17000 people killed, I am thinking of a country like Haiti devastated by an earthquake in 2010 and 10 years after the country has faced another earthquake. Speaking of Psychiatry, and security for such a survived population what should be the timeline for those people to be healed from domages?
Junior Oriol
01:21:51
damages?
Sadeq Rahimi
01:29:49
That was a wonderful account Fatih! Thank you. Can you please write down the names or any literature on that Turkey-Afghan collaboration project?
Byron Good
01:30:41
I agree, Junior. I also think of earthquake and tsunami in Indonesia. I just sent Mary-Jo a note that we should do a session about this in the spring semester!
Mary Jo DelVecchio Good
01:31:12
Thank you Prof Artinli for an illuminating history and for this shift from bio to psycho-social-political and community affective solidarity leading to social movements too
Arlene Katz
01:32:53
Yes, I agree Byron, to track the Haitian response to both earthquakes, tent cities, emphasizing the social, accompaniment. I have just sent a note to Christophe about this… thanks Byron
Byron Good
01:32:58
We could also link this work — Haiti, Aceh, Turkey — to Seinenu’s work during the democracy era, with groups focused on PTSD coming into Burma.
Annabelle Slingerland
01:33:26
maybe including beyond the timeline, how postponed trauma and recurrences and wider secondary impact of not just natural disasters but responses and the question can people be healed or do they ‘transmute’ to a new state only to be cared for but also fuel society in a renewed enriching way?
Byron Good
01:34:58
So Annabelle and Junior — both issues of how disaster response does or does not transform psychiatry, and what the long-term effects in communities are…
Annabelle Slingerland
01:35:57
Thanks Byron, yes
Junior Oriol
01:36:27
Thank you Prof Byron
FATİH ARTVİNLİ
01:36:47
Nevzat Eşref Bengin (Turkish psychiatrist’s name), arrived in 1934 to Kabil. And Cevad Zeaki Bill continued till 1942.
Sadeq Rahimi
01:38:05
Thank you Fatih bey! Have you written about this collaboration?
FATİH ARTVİNLİ
01:39:22
Not yet Sadeq Hocam, only one short account published in Turkish many years ago
Junior Oriol
01:39:32
Thanks to both Prof Dole and Artvinli for this instructive presentation.
Seinenu Thein-Lemelson
01:39:53
Byron: Yes, absolutely. Especially since the work and interventions in Burma did not get that far before the coup and now there has been a resurgence of interest in psychiatric interventions and a lot of Burmese in the diaspora who have been through social work and clinical psych programs in the States are now putting out podcasts using a lot of psychiatric and psychological terms in an attempt to give digital therapeutic interventions
Michael M. J. Fischer
01:41:37
Fascinating accounts both Chris and Fatih Artvinli! Thank you. I do wonder, Chris, about the gap between the on-ground level of analysis (assemblages, diplomacy) and the high-level security generalizations (“colonialism” — European, Israeli, settler colonialism): seems a bit too easy, as Fatih points out with his Afghan example, and indeed the shifts of psychiatric frames from France to Germany to America. I would add here the lovely comments by Akile Gursoy about suicide, increased marital problems, etc. — the on-the-ground indicators.
Junior Oriol
01:42:36
I would like to have more explanation about how does Transcultural Psychiatry work? How can Global Psychiatry transcend cultural barriers considering every country has its own culture and reality is different?
Michael M. J. Fischer
01:43:00
What about Lebanese psychiatrists from the civil war experience?
orkideh behrouzan
01:44:05
Fascinating discussion Chris and Fatih (and fascinating parallels with the History of Psychiatry in Iran). Sadly I have to leave soon for a PhD viva, so sorry to miss the rest of the discussion. I was curious to know more about the way PTSD has offered a vocabulary to re-politicize trauma, as Chris explained, by the Israeli state in line with a securitised colonial agenda. I was wondering how this specific re-politicizing aspect of the language of PTSD (from above) has manifested in the formation of new assemblages and knowledge formation and translated among ordinary people in Turkey (Fatih mentioned decreasing stigma in the aftermath of this psychiatric turn post-earthquake). Thank you again for these wonderful presentations!
Byron Good
01:45:03
Thanks, Orkideh!
Michael M. J. Fischer
01:46:34
Aslihan had a brilliant passage about the earthquake in her dissertation and first drafts of her book that I don’t think made it into the final book.
Annabelle Slingerland
01:47:45
Asihan- that would add comparative analyses of those who stayed and those who went away? Like in Gallipoli during Ataturk, and during SA where some fled to the US while others stayed later developing trauma of guild to leave the country and trauma of depression to not be able to turn the situation around
Virginia Moreira
01:51:33
Thank you for these wonderful presentations! The idea of disaster situations and trauma and Post-trauma modifying psychiatry and even psychopathology does make a lot of sense to me. Recently I have seen patients who have lived experiences of covid lived like trauma and now live it like post-trauma, and it is harder then ever to think about only one diagnosis. It seems to me that. Even anxiety, depression, are very specifically lived.
Byron Good
01:52:17
Really interesting question, observation, Virginia…
Virginia Moreira
01:52:32
An other point that interest me very much is group interventions and how you did use it. Thank you! And congratulations!
Seinenu Thein-Lemelson
01:58:13
Thank you to everyone. Wonderful, fascinating presentations. I have to run and get my booster shot. Thank you for allowing me to join today.
Annabelle Slingerland
02:01:48
Might that depend on who finances organizes the group interventions and to what aim. Some earthquakes by gas factories broke houses down, but the group therapy and the stigmatizing of the victims totally got them down, which made them eligible for more therapy etc but what about their well being and ability to move on or integrate it well. The ones who did not receive therapy and attached another narrative to their fate is doing well, took their loss and could differentiate better what was theirs and what was not, less defining their identities, did not lose their jobs and life direction. Some got general literature and distilled what applied to them and worked through that with an individual or small group therapist/ psychiatrist outside of the distaster inclusive groups. Also what about the NYU Ben Yishay PTSS neuropsychological Israeli developed program. Thank you very much Chris Dole and JihARtvinli, organizers and audience!
Mary Jo DelVecchio Good
02:01:50
Byron, Akile and I were at a major Turkish cultural psychiatry meeting in Trabzon with many psychiatrists , many had to leave quickly as they were called back to service in Istanbul
Virginia Moreira
02:03:40
Thank you Anabelle!
orkideh behrouzan
02:07:52
I really wish I didn’t have to leave! Thank you both so very much, and lovely to see everyone :)
Mary Jo DelVecchio Good
02:11:02
Haiti has violent trauma too
Arlene Katz
02:11:21
absolutely
Annikki Herranen-Tabibi
02:14:27
Thank you all — for the rich, compelling, complex presentations and generative discussion!
jaswant guzder
02:17:04
thank you for this wonderful discussion