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Eugenics and Statistics; Past, Present and Future - Shared screen with speaker view
David Colquhoun
01:08:30
Please post a link to where the recording will be posted
Loni Tabb
01:11:16
In producing evidence related to health and social disparities - particularly, racial/ethnic inequities in various health related outcomes - how does this help, hurt, or even promote the eugenics lens of science?
Marcello Pagano
01:11:41
IT will first edit (clean up) the recordings then we will post them next week, I believe.
Priti Thareja
01:13:12
Hi Everyone, I will send out an email next week with the information regarding where to access the recording.
Matt Hayat
01:13:40
Thanks for making the recording available after. This talk is SO GOOD.
Priti Thareja
01:14:52
Hi Loni, can you type your question in the Q&A section?
Sarah Peko-Spicer
01:16:50
Speak on it!
Sean T. Hammond
01:18:33
The field of allometry (coming out of the work by Dubois in the late 1800s) is uncomfortably close Galton’s measurement-based eugenics—much closer than statistics. At the same time a lot of people that employ allometry in their studies are not aware of it's roots. As educators, do how can we make students aware of the past without making the applicacble methods distasteful?
Priti Thareja
01:19:43
Hi Everyone, please submit your questions in the "Q&A" section.
Sean T. Hammond
01:29:34
excellent
David Colquhoun
01:38:41
where will it be posted next week?
Loni Tabb
01:40:19
For example…. When looking at contemporary measures of residential segregation, it seems null and void if we don’t look or even ignore the historical measures of residential segregation (i.e. redlining).
Miles Ott
01:41:00
Thank you!
Loni Tabb
01:41:01
Thank you all for presenting!
Kamaria Hayden
01:41:15
this was SO GOOD, thank you for your insights, and hope to see another of these soon!
Leigh Senderowicz
01:41:20
This was phenomenal. Thank you all so much!!!