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Guest Lecture on Afro-Latin American Studies with Paulina Alberto (University of Michigan): Black Legend: The Extraordinary Raúl Grigera and New Stories of Afro-Argentina - Shared screen with speaker view
Brandon Tilghman
01:08:30
This is wonderful and so engaging. Truly appreciate this space.
Vincent Brown
01:23:33
Thank you so much for this engaging presentation, Professor Alberto! I’m sorry I have to go to another meeting and cannot stay for the Q&A.Much of the process you describe is familiar to the cultural history of the U.S. and elsewhere in the Americas: African diaspora innovations and expressive forms become the property of white people as they become profitable, respectable, or symbolically valorized by the nation. Would you say more about the distinctively Argentine aspects of this common process? How would you compare and contrast Raul Grigera’s experience with that of his contemporary Bert Williams, the celebrated vaudeville performer in the U.S., who W.C. Fields called the funniest and saddest man he had ever met?
Timothy Gupton
01:23:36
Fascinating. Brava!
Cheryl Green
01:24:12
This was absolutely wonderful! Thank you so very much for your research, and the passion that galvanizes it!
Tiya Miles
01:24:28
Thank you, Professor Alberto, for that wonderful talk!
Noemia Dos Santos
01:24:33
Paulina, estão chorando de emoção com suas poderosas descobertas.
Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham
01:24:58
Truly fascinating!
Noemia Dos Santos
01:24:59
*estou chorando
Adelaida Arango
01:25:01
Muchas gracias Paulina….
marial iglesias
01:25:13
Gracias Paulina!!! fascinating!
Cornelius Moore
01:25:29
Thank you for the fascinating and very informative presentation.
Dash Harris Machado
01:26:20
His story is so commonplace it still happens today.
Sandra Duarte
01:26:53
So fascinating! Thank you Paulina!
Bruno Carvalho
01:28:50
On Dom Obá:
Bruno Carvalho
01:28:51
https://read.dukeupress.edu/hahr/article/76/3/597/144966/Prince-of-the-People-The-Life-and-Times-of-a
Naja Weeks
01:30:58
This the same story that happened and continues to happen here in the U S. to Black folks We are rejected, however our culture / arts are coopted and claimed as their own, as well as monetized.
Dash Harris Machado
01:32:55
And then discarded after intellectual property is stolen, co-opted and nationalized.
Naja Weeks
01:33:34
Exactly!!
Geri Augusto
01:36:25
Living in Angola, I saw many uses and meanings to the Kikongo root word "ndombe." Did you come across different resignifications of the word, in researching the culture and communities of ca'ndombe in Argentina?
Dennis Bedeau
01:51:20
Classic cultural appropriation!
Cecilia Lisa Eliceche
02:00:26
Professor Alberto thank you so much. I have to leave because of my baby. I hope the recording will be available later. thank you for the important work.
Julia Lujan
02:06:29
There’s a historian, Cirio, who writes and teaches at la Universidad de La Plata
marial iglesias
02:06:36
It is an honest admission. You are not his "savior", you can't give him back his "voice". It is better to admit it.
Gina Dorcely
02:07:41
All of Latin America is such a cautionary tale, in fundamental respects.
Gina Dorcely
02:08:17
What I see occurring is an effort by white presenting Latin Americans to remediate that history and reality.
Gina Dorcely
02:08:39
I say this looking from the perspective of Haitian history and reality.
Dash Harris Machado
02:08:42
“White presenting” lol you mean white
Dash Harris Machado
02:09:07
Language matters
Gina Dorcely
02:09:13
Indeed. I do.
Cecilia Lisa Eliceche
02:09:59
In fact the perpetual genocide is repordce in the very fact of calling out territories as “ latin” america.
Gina Dorcely
02:10:09
But because the issue is has a different face and another complex in Haiti I will sometimes revert to white prsenting.
Cecilia Lisa Eliceche
02:10:18
as if we would be all of roman and greek origin.
Gina Dorcely
02:10:58
It is to acknowledge the reality of the consistent genocide. IT IS; it persits despite these efforts. It is STILL nothing else discursively.
Cecilia Lisa Eliceche
02:11:01
we are children of various nations and comunities that are not european
Gina Dorcely
02:11:44
We cannot "make" it something else superficially or in utopian tems.
Gina Dorcely
02:12:00
Discursively even.
Gina Dorcely
02:12:27
Latin America is in the baby steps stage of its reckoning.
Janvieve Williams
02:12:57
I think people white people in Latin America need to grapple with whiteness, the same as Black people have had to historically deal with the history of racism that we have inherited. Whiteness in Latin America is no different than whiteness in Europe nor in North America, and yes it has to grappled by those that benefit by those systems.
Dash Harris Machado
02:13:01
No Latin America is not. If you’re not familiar with Black movements in the region just say that. We are at 500 years of this.
Gina Dorcely
02:13:20
These are not my questions. My questions are other.
Dash Harris Machado
02:14:01
Right. White folks should study whiteness and their relationship to power. Black folks can tell our own stories.
Doris Sommer
02:14:08
Thank you, Paulina, for your subtle and fearless work.
Deborah Vaughan
02:14:18
Excellent and informative presentation...Thank you.
Gina Dorcely
02:14:20
I know the history of the movements. I have lived with them, in study from my household and overtly in household since in reality childhood. I have limitations. That is not my limitation.
Gina Dorcely
02:14:31
Happy to continue discussion elsewhere if you wish.
Dash Harris Machado
02:14:51
Not interested.
Gina Dorcely
02:16:02
Your call, of course.
Julia Lujan
02:24:54
I’d love a second session!