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The Art of Talking Science, Part 1 - Shared screen with speaker view
HU CFAR
11:42
we are on
HU CFAR
17:05
Registration for the December 6 session here https://conta.cc/3DoGpB6
Noah Miranda
24:32
are we going to get access to these slides?
Kate Powis
25:37
This recording and the slides will be posted on the Harvard University CFAR Website.
HU CFAR
25:48
We will post the recording to our website https://cfar.globalhealth.harvard.edu/
Monty Montano
26:37
curious about trust in academic journals, given the expansion of preprint online influence in the social realm, e.g., COVID
Kate Powis
27:16
Great consideration Monty. We will get Dr. Slaugenhaupt's thoughts on that.
Elodie Ekoka
45:31
Great presentation! Where can we find coaching to make our presentations more accessible to a general audience?
Kate Powis
46:23
Elodie great question. Where are you located.
Dale Barnhart
47:12
I know good communication takes a lot of effort and time, but that effort is often not rewarded in traditional academia. How can you demonstrate this skill in a way that is better recognized/appreciated in academic circles?
HU CFAR
52:59
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y66YKWz_sf0
Elodie Ekoka
53:23
HSPH
Elodie Ekoka
53:37
Dept of immunology and infectious diseases
Kunjal Patel
54:05
As you mentioned science is continually evolving and what we know today could change tomorrow as more data come in. That leads to distrust in science since our elevator pitch today could be different tomorrow. Should we be acknowledging that in our elevator pitch that we give today or should we assume the audience understands that science is continually evolving? Note: I don't think the evolving nature of science is understood in the wider audience.
ingrid bassett
01:01:11
Thank you very much for an inspiring talk, Dr. Slaugenhaupt!